Carl Moore, 60, sits with 7-month-old Lucy, in the waiting room of the Spay/Neuter Clinic on Thursday, the last day of operation. Lucy was one of 13 animals Dr. Sheila Dick performed spay and neuter surgeries on Thursday, June 30, 2016.

Carl Moore, 60, sits with 7-month-old Lucy, in the waiting room of the Spay/Neuter Clinic on Thursday, the last day of operation. Lucy was one of 13 animals Dr. Sheila Dick performed spay and neuter surgeries on Thursday, June 30, 2016.

 Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician writes down the names of the animals, their age, weight and their owners' last name on the surgery list. The list is used to keep track of the animals to know what order to perform the surgeries. Dr. Sheila Dick has developed a routine of biggest to smallest. 

Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician writes down the names of the animals, their age, weight and their owners' last name on the surgery list. The list is used to keep track of the animals to know what order to perform the surgeries. Dr. Sheila Dick has developed a routine of biggest to smallest. 

 Carl Moore, 60, watches a Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician pets Lucy before receiving a preanesthetic on Thursday, June 30, 2016, at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Lucy was the last dog Dr. Sheila Dick spayed at the clinic before closing its doors.  

Carl Moore, 60, watches a Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician pets Lucy before receiving a preanesthetic on Thursday, June 30, 2016, at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Lucy was the last dog Dr. Sheila Dick spayed at the clinic before closing its doors.  

 Dr. Sheila Dick listens to Trouble, a cat available for adoption at the Noble County Humane Society, before neutering him on Thursday, June 30, 2016.

Dr. Sheila Dick listens to Trouble, a cat available for adoption at the Noble County Humane Society, before neutering him on Thursday, June 30, 2016.

 Dr. Sheila Dick has been working at the Spay/Neuter Clinic for 32 years, and is ready to retire. In addition to the numbers dropping around this time of the year, she wanted to retire to spend time with her daughter and grandson who are visiting from New Zealand. Dick will continue to work at the Fort Wayne Pet Hospital three days a week after leaving the clinic. 

Dr. Sheila Dick has been working at the Spay/Neuter Clinic for 32 years, and is ready to retire. In addition to the numbers dropping around this time of the year, she wanted to retire to spend time with her daughter and grandson who are visiting from New Zealand. Dick will continue to work at the Fort Wayne Pet Hospital three days a week after leaving the clinic. 

 Dr. Sheila Dick scrubs up before starting her last set of surgeries on Thursday, June 30, 2016. "I would love to know how many surgeries I have done here," she said after she was finished for the day. Dick and some of the staff members will be continuing to come into the building to finish up paperwork and cleaning. 

Dr. Sheila Dick scrubs up before starting her last set of surgeries on Thursday, June 30, 2016. "I would love to know how many surgeries I have done here," she said after she was finished for the day. Dick and some of the staff members will be continuing to come into the building to finish up paperwork and cleaning. 

 Kit Kat, a cat available for adoption at the Noble County Humane Society, looks out into the prep and examine room at the clinic. Him and two other male cats were neutered before going back to the shelter. 

Kit Kat, a cat available for adoption at the Noble County Humane Society, looks out into the prep and examine room at the clinic. Him and two other male cats were neutered before going back to the shelter. 

 Depending on if it was a spay or neuter surgery, Dr. Sheila Dick would switch sides of the table. She said it was because she had always done it that way and it has become muscle memory. The Spay/Neuter Clinic prepares to do 24 surgeries a day; 12 spays between cats and dogs, eight dogs for castration and an unlimited of number of male cats can be castrated, according to Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician at the clinic. 

Depending on if it was a spay or neuter surgery, Dr. Sheila Dick would switch sides of the table. She said it was because she had always done it that way and it has become muscle memory. The Spay/Neuter Clinic prepares to do 24 surgeries a day; 12 spays between cats and dogs, eight dogs for castration and an unlimited of number of male cats can be castrated, according to Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician at the clinic. 

 The Spay/Neuter Clinic works with various humane societies and rescue organizations to do spays and neuters for them. On Thursday, June 30, 2016, Soul Dog Rescue and Rehab and the Noble County Humane Society brought animals in for the last day. 

The Spay/Neuter Clinic works with various humane societies and rescue organizations to do spays and neuters for them. On Thursday, June 30, 2016, Soul Dog Rescue and Rehab and the Noble County Humane Society brought animals in for the last day. 

 In the month of June, Dr. Sheila Dick performed 237 surgeries at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Dick said the longest surgery would take is 20 minutes and that would more than likely be on a spaying a dog. The time measurements depend on the dog, its weight and its age. 

In the month of June, Dr. Sheila Dick performed 237 surgeries at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Dick said the longest surgery would take is 20 minutes and that would more than likely be on a spaying a dog. The time measurements depend on the dog, its weight and its age. 

 Lynette Swineheart, a veterinarian technician of 3-1/2 years at the clinic, hugs Dr. Sheila Dick before leaving the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Swineherd brought donuts for the staff members to have on the last day. 

Lynette Swineheart, a veterinarian technician of 3-1/2 years at the clinic, hugs Dr. Sheila Dick before leaving the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Swineherd brought donuts for the staff members to have on the last day. 

 Katie Adelman, a registered paramedic, places a microchip into Thumbelina as Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician holds her on Thursday, June 30, 2016, at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Venus Coppernoll, 58, brought Thumbelina, and five other kittens, to be microchipped because it was the last day the clinic was open. The clinic microchipped animals using Home Again, a nation-wide microchip database. 

Katie Adelman, a registered paramedic, places a microchip into Thumbelina as Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician holds her on Thursday, June 30, 2016, at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Venus Coppernoll, 58, brought Thumbelina, and five other kittens, to be microchipped because it was the last day the clinic was open. The clinic microchipped animals using Home Again, a nation-wide microchip database. 

 Sherrie Irving was the last staff member in the clinic on Thursday, June 30, 2016. She took out the trash, folded laundry, caught up on paperwork, cleaned tubes and started loads of laundry. Irving plans on finding a part-time job after everything is finished with the clinic.

Sherrie Irving was the last staff member in the clinic on Thursday, June 30, 2016. She took out the trash, folded laundry, caught up on paperwork, cleaned tubes and started loads of laundry. Irving plans on finding a part-time job after everything is finished with the clinic.

 Carl Moore, 60, sits with 7-month-old Lucy, in the waiting room of the Spay/Neuter Clinic on Thursday, the last day of operation. Lucy was one of 13 animals Dr. Sheila Dick performed spay and neuter surgeries on Thursday, June 30, 2016.
 Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician writes down the names of the animals, their age, weight and their owners' last name on the surgery list. The list is used to keep track of the animals to know what order to perform the surgeries. Dr. Sheila Dick has developed a routine of biggest to smallest. 
 Carl Moore, 60, watches a Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician pets Lucy before receiving a preanesthetic on Thursday, June 30, 2016, at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Lucy was the last dog Dr. Sheila Dick spayed at the clinic before closing its doors.  
 Dr. Sheila Dick listens to Trouble, a cat available for adoption at the Noble County Humane Society, before neutering him on Thursday, June 30, 2016.
 Dr. Sheila Dick has been working at the Spay/Neuter Clinic for 32 years, and is ready to retire. In addition to the numbers dropping around this time of the year, she wanted to retire to spend time with her daughter and grandson who are visiting from New Zealand. Dick will continue to work at the Fort Wayne Pet Hospital three days a week after leaving the clinic. 
 Dr. Sheila Dick scrubs up before starting her last set of surgeries on Thursday, June 30, 2016. "I would love to know how many surgeries I have done here," she said after she was finished for the day. Dick and some of the staff members will be continuing to come into the building to finish up paperwork and cleaning. 
 Kit Kat, a cat available for adoption at the Noble County Humane Society, looks out into the prep and examine room at the clinic. Him and two other male cats were neutered before going back to the shelter. 
 Depending on if it was a spay or neuter surgery, Dr. Sheila Dick would switch sides of the table. She said it was because she had always done it that way and it has become muscle memory. The Spay/Neuter Clinic prepares to do 24 surgeries a day; 12 spays between cats and dogs, eight dogs for castration and an unlimited of number of male cats can be castrated, according to Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician at the clinic. 
 The Spay/Neuter Clinic works with various humane societies and rescue organizations to do spays and neuters for them. On Thursday, June 30, 2016, Soul Dog Rescue and Rehab and the Noble County Humane Society brought animals in for the last day. 
 In the month of June, Dr. Sheila Dick performed 237 surgeries at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Dick said the longest surgery would take is 20 minutes and that would more than likely be on a spaying a dog. The time measurements depend on the dog, its weight and its age. 
 Lynette Swineheart, a veterinarian technician of 3-1/2 years at the clinic, hugs Dr. Sheila Dick before leaving the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Swineherd brought donuts for the staff members to have on the last day. 
 Katie Adelman, a registered paramedic, places a microchip into Thumbelina as Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician holds her on Thursday, June 30, 2016, at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Venus Coppernoll, 58, brought Thumbelina, and five other kittens, to be microchipped because it was the last day the clinic was open. The clinic microchipped animals using Home Again, a nation-wide microchip database. 
 Sherrie Irving was the last staff member in the clinic on Thursday, June 30, 2016. She took out the trash, folded laundry, caught up on paperwork, cleaned tubes and started loads of laundry. Irving plans on finding a part-time job after everything is finished with the clinic.

Carl Moore, 60, sits with 7-month-old Lucy, in the waiting room of the Spay/Neuter Clinic on Thursday, the last day of operation. Lucy was one of 13 animals Dr. Sheila Dick performed spay and neuter surgeries on Thursday, June 30, 2016.

Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician writes down the names of the animals, their age, weight and their owners' last name on the surgery list. The list is used to keep track of the animals to know what order to perform the surgeries. Dr. Sheila Dick has developed a routine of biggest to smallest. 

Carl Moore, 60, watches a Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician pets Lucy before receiving a preanesthetic on Thursday, June 30, 2016, at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Lucy was the last dog Dr. Sheila Dick spayed at the clinic before closing its doors.  

Dr. Sheila Dick listens to Trouble, a cat available for adoption at the Noble County Humane Society, before neutering him on Thursday, June 30, 2016.

Dr. Sheila Dick has been working at the Spay/Neuter Clinic for 32 years, and is ready to retire. In addition to the numbers dropping around this time of the year, she wanted to retire to spend time with her daughter and grandson who are visiting from New Zealand. Dick will continue to work at the Fort Wayne Pet Hospital three days a week after leaving the clinic. 

Dr. Sheila Dick scrubs up before starting her last set of surgeries on Thursday, June 30, 2016. "I would love to know how many surgeries I have done here," she said after she was finished for the day. Dick and some of the staff members will be continuing to come into the building to finish up paperwork and cleaning. 

Kit Kat, a cat available for adoption at the Noble County Humane Society, looks out into the prep and examine room at the clinic. Him and two other male cats were neutered before going back to the shelter. 

Depending on if it was a spay or neuter surgery, Dr. Sheila Dick would switch sides of the table. She said it was because she had always done it that way and it has become muscle memory. The Spay/Neuter Clinic prepares to do 24 surgeries a day; 12 spays between cats and dogs, eight dogs for castration and an unlimited of number of male cats can be castrated, according to Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician at the clinic. 

The Spay/Neuter Clinic works with various humane societies and rescue organizations to do spays and neuters for them. On Thursday, June 30, 2016, Soul Dog Rescue and Rehab and the Noble County Humane Society brought animals in for the last day. 

In the month of June, Dr. Sheila Dick performed 237 surgeries at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Dick said the longest surgery would take is 20 minutes and that would more than likely be on a spaying a dog. The time measurements depend on the dog, its weight and its age. 

Lynette Swineheart, a veterinarian technician of 3-1/2 years at the clinic, hugs Dr. Sheila Dick before leaving the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Swineherd brought donuts for the staff members to have on the last day. 

Katie Adelman, a registered paramedic, places a microchip into Thumbelina as Sherrie Irving, a veterinarian technician holds her on Thursday, June 30, 2016, at the Spay/Neuter Clinic. Venus Coppernoll, 58, brought Thumbelina, and five other kittens, to be microchipped because it was the last day the clinic was open. The clinic microchipped animals using Home Again, a nation-wide microchip database. 

Sherrie Irving was the last staff member in the clinic on Thursday, June 30, 2016. She took out the trash, folded laundry, caught up on paperwork, cleaned tubes and started loads of laundry. Irving plans on finding a part-time job after everything is finished with the clinic.

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